Lockdown details you may have missed during PM’s speech – including garden rule

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The morale around the country is significantly higher following Boris Johnson's lockdown roadmap reveal, in which he earmarked June 21 as the date normality could be restored across the UK.

The Prime Minister addressed the nation on Monday evening alongside Chris Whitty, England's Chief Medical Officer to explain the steps that need to be taken for the country to continue on the trajectory that would allow measures to be eased.

Given the fact the PM touched on topics such as the return of restaurants, nightclubs and when we can see loved ones again – there may have been some smaller points that you might have missed in all the excitement.

Though he remained cautious in his approach, Mr Johnson promised England a "summer of hope" – free of the kind of restrictions that have weighed so heavy on the nation over the past 11 months.

Here are some of the key points you may have missed first time around, as reported by Birmingham Live.

  • All children will return to school on the same day – and get tested for Covid-19

As of March 8, all school children will return to their classrooms as well as college students.

The government has already confirmed children of secondary and college age will be routinely tested for Covid-19 twice a week.

  • The rule of six does apply to private gardens

For the first time in more than two months, the orders "stay at home" will be scrapped in place of "stay local" messaging from March 29, when the rule of six comes into play.

The rule of six means six people from differing households can meet in a safe, outdoor environment. This will apply to private gardens as well as other outdoor settings.

  • Boris Johnson scraps regional tier system for good with Rule of Six back from March 29

  • Pubs can open in April – but you won't be allowed inside until May

As of April 12, pubs bars and restaurants are all free to reopen, but customers will have to reside in a beer garden or at an outdoor table.

There will also be no curfew, or rules surrounding "substantial meals" like there was previously last year.

Pubs, bars and restaurants are expected to welcome customers inside by May 17 at the earliest.

The rule of six, or two households, will also apply in these settings, but will be removed if you're in the beer garden from this date.

  • Boris Johnson's four tests for easing lockdown revealed ahead of lockdown roadmap

  • Hairdressers and gyms set to reopen in April

Though many of us may be in desperate need of a trim, hairdressers will not reopen any earlier than April 12.

Gyms will be available to attend individually or within household groups from April 12, but you can not enter with anyone outside of your bubble.

  • Cinemas and theatres will have to wait until May

The government are reportedly pinpointing May 17 as the date cinemas can reopen.

  • Nightclubs in June

It's time to dust off the party attire as Nightclubs have been given a reopening date of June 21 if all factors of Boris Johnson's roadmap strategy go to plan.

  • No sex until May in new bedroom setback for single Brits wanting sleepovers

  • Staycations from April onwards

Though international travel will come later, the PM's roadmap does allow people to travel to self-contained accommodation with members of their own households as well as domestic overnight stays from April 12.

Hotels as well as B&B's will not reopen until the following month at the earliest.

  • Summer holidays are on hold

International travel is not expected to be permitted until May 17 at the earliest, with the date subject to a review.

  • All of this depends on four key tests

Each time a lockdown measure is set to be eased, it will be subject to a review which takes into account four key factors, these are:

  • Whether or not the vaccine roll-out remains successful.
  • If the evidence suggests that the vaccine is having an impact on reducing hospitalisations and deaths in those who have been vaccinated.
  • Infection rates are low enough that easing further measures would not risk a strain on the NHS.
  • A potential new strain of the virus does not cause concern.
  • Boris Johnson
  • Lockdown

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